h_medicine_vic

a brief history of medicine in Melbourne and Victoria

21st century

  • 2018: Labour wins state elections and announces funding for the building of a new Footscray Hospital
  • 2018: funding provided for an expansion of the Sunshine ED - building to start June 2019
  • 2017: state govt gives $50m to plan for a new Footscray Hospital but unfortunately, no funding for the much needed extension of Sunshine ED
  • 2017: Meningococcal A,C,W,Y secondary school vaccine program for adolescents in Years 10, 11 and 12 or aged 15 to 19 years. Time-limited, ceases 31 December 2017.
  • 2017: building of the Joan Kirner Womens and Childrens building commences at Sunshine Hospital
  • 2016: clot retrieval for applicable stroke patients commences at RMH
  • 2016: Peter Mac Hosp moves from East Melb to opposite RMH to form the Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre (VCCC)
  • 2016: Herpes Zoster vaccine introduced at 70 years of age
  • 2016: Commonwealth No Jab No Pay legislation commenced.
  • 2015: Western Health moves most sub-specialities from Footscray to Sunshine and establishes ICU, CCU, cath lab services at Sunshine
  • 2015: Boostrix® (dTpa) vaccine program commences for women in 3rd TM pregnancy (> 28 weeks)
  • 2013: Hib and meningococcal C (Hib–MenC) vaccine introduced (Menitorix®). Hib–MenC vaccine replaces the Hibvaccine Hiberix® and the meningococcal C vaccine NeisVac C® given at 12 months of age 2013: HPV vaccine (Gardasil®) introduced for secondary school boys in Year 7 as an ongoing program, and a 2-year time-limited program for boys in Year 9 in 2013 and 2014
  • 2012: new RCH building opens
  • 2010: HPV vaccine (Gardasil®) introduced in a Year 7 secondary school program (or age equivalent) for girls
  • 2010's: Australia-wide increasing metamphetamine addiction epidemic, especially affecting the unemployed and those in rural towns, resulting in increasing violent crimes, home invasions, car jackings as well as trauma due to psychotic episodes
  • 2008: diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis, hepatitis B, poliomyelitis and Hib (Infanrix hexa®) combination vaccine introduced at 2, 4 and 6 months of age
  • 2007: rotavirus (RotaTeq®) vaccine scheduled at 2, 4 and 6 months of age
  • 2007: Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for girls aged between 12 and 13 in Year 7 of secondary school, with a 2-year catch-up period to the end of June 2009 for girls aged 14–18 years, and introduced for young women aged between 18 and 26 for a 2-year period to the end of June 2009
  • 2007: Hepatitis B vaccine introduced for household contacts of a person living with hepatitis B and for prisoners
  • 2006: A GP clinic is established near the RCH Emergency Department
  • 2005: the former Melbourne Extended Care and Rehabilitation Service was renamed The Royal Melbourne Hospital – Royal Park Campus
  • 2005: Austin Health was transformed when the Mercy Hospital for Women relocated to Heidelberg as part of the Austin Mercy Project, providing complete health care in Heidelberg
  • 2005: funding announced for new site for RCH adjacent to the existing site
  • 2005: IPV in combination with diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis scheduled at 2, 4 and 6 months and 4 years of age , and OPV (Sabin) ceased at 2, 4 and 6 months and 4 years of age
  • 2004: RWH regains its independent board
  • 2004: 4, 5 and 6-antigen combination vaccines introduced
  • 2003: the Royal Melbourne Dental Hospital moved to Swanston St, Carlton
  • 2003: Meningococcal C conjugate vaccine introduced at 12 months of age and 1–19 years meningococcal C conjugate vaccination program (until 2006)
  • 2000s: Victoria’s first dedicated Stroke Unit established at RMH
  • 2002: NeisVac C® and Menjugate® meningococcal C conjugate vaccine introduced (unfunded)
  • 2001: Meningitec® meningococcal C conjugate vaccine introduced (unfunded) and Hib TITER® vaccine ceased (only Pedvax® available)
  • 2001: childhood pneumococcal vaccine (7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine) introduced for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children only
  • 2001: Western Health takes full control over Sunshine Hospital as the ED is redeveloped for adult services as well as womens and childrens
  • 2001: varicella (chickenpox) vaccine introduced (unfunded)
  • 2001: Hepatitis B adult vaccine (2 doses) introduced in Year 7 school program and for people who inject drugs
  • 2000: John Cade Building housing mental health units and services at RMH opens.
  • 2000: Comvax® (Hib–hepatitis B) vaccine introduced and OPV ceased in year 9–10 school program
  • 2000: hepatitis B vaccine birth dose introduced and Hepatitis B boosters ceased as was 10-yearly ADT boosters (diphtheria–tetanus) which were ceased

20th century

  • 1999: hospitals mainly concerned with potential ramifications of Y2K on IT systems
  • 1999: MMR vaccine campaign for 18–30 year olds
  • 1999: Infanrix® (DTP) vaccine introduced – from 2 months of age to 4 years of age inclusive
  • 1998: Mercy Private enter a joint venture with St Vincent's Private Hospital, becoming St Vincent's & Mercy Private Hospital, Australia's largest private Catholic hospital.
  • 1998: hepatitis B paediatric vaccine (3 doses) introduced in a Year 7 secondary school program
  • 1998: Pneumococcal pneumonia vaccine (Pneumovax 23®) introduced for people aged 65 years and over
  • 1997: influenza vaccination program began for over 65 year olds
  • 1997: Victorian Infectious Diseases Service established at RMH
  • 1996: the RMH took over the general infectious diseases services of the former Fairfield Hospital after its closure in June 1996
  • 1995: Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital's board abolished and it becomes part of the Inner and Eastern Healthcare Network
  • 1995: RMH became part of the Western Health Care Network, then the North Western Health Care Network from 28 October 1997 and from 1 July 2000, Melbourne Health
  • 1995: RMH assumed responsibility for the psychiatric services of the former Royal Park Psychiatric Hospital
  • 1995: RCH and RWH merge as “Women's and Children's Health Care Network” which also takes control of Sunshine Hospital's Womens and Childrens services
  • 1995: The Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre (A&RMC) was formed by the amalgamation of the Austin Hospital (including the Royal Talbot Rehabilitation Centre) and the Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital (HRH)
  • 1995: Kennett Govt restructures health services in Victoria
  • 1995: State Govt establishes Metropolitan Hospitals Planning Board to further review the distribution of hospital beds, aim was to integrate the smaller community hospitals and aged care facilities with the large tertiary referral hospitals and psychiatric services, through common governance structures which resulted in the establishment of large health care networks and completed the transformation of hospitals from charities to public services under government control and resulted in the controversial closure of some smaller hospitals.
  • 1994: RMH Research Foundation established (became the Melbourne Health Research Directorate in 2002 and then in 2008, the Office for Research)
  • 1994: 1st MRI machine purchased for RCH
  • 1994: Peter Mac Hosp moves to East Melb site from its previous site on the corner of William and Little Lonsdale Sts
  • 1994: MMR vaccine introduced for males and females in Year 6 of primary school
  • 1993: new underground carpark opens at RMH
  • 1993: hepatitis A (Havrix®) vaccine introduced
  • 1993: Fairfield Hospital laboratories amalgamated with other laboratories to become the integrated Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratories
  • 1993: Commonwealth Minister for Health approved the recognition of emergency medicine as a principal specialty
  • 1992: Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine introduced (catch-up vaccine for children aged 18 months to under 5 years, then in 1993, introduced for children aged 2 months to 18 months) quickly leading to a 95% reduction in childhood invasive HiB infections such as epiglottitis
  • 1992: mental health asylums in Victoria decommissioned and replaced with community and general hospital care
  • 1992: Monash Medical Centre opens
  • 1991: Prince Henry's Hospital closes
  • 1990: Sunshine Hospital opens primarily for Womens and Childrens services
  • 1989: measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine introduced
  • 1988: Royal Children's Hospital Foundation (for fundraising) is established.
  • 1988: Kew Asylum / Willsmere Psychiatric Hospital closed.
  • 1987: Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital decommissioned
  • 1987: Prince Henry's was amalgamated with the Queen Victoria Medical Centre and Moorabbin Hospital to form the Monash Medical Centre
  • 1987: Final graduates from the last RCH School of Nursing
  • 1987: hepatitis B Vax II (recombinant) vaccine introduced
  • 1987: infants 'at risk' commenced birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine;
  • 1987: Pneumovax 23® vaccine introduced for pneumococcal disease
  • 1986: RMH amalgamates with the Essendon and District Memorial Hospital (EDMH)
  • 1986: Murdoch Institute founded at RCH
  • 1986: combined diphtheria–tetanus vaccine superseded by DTP vaccine as the 4th booster dose, introducing the first pertussis-containing vaccine booster at 18 months of age
  • 1986: 1st Fellowship Exam of the ACEM - 8 successful candidates
  • 1985: Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital research develops the Bionic Ear
  • 1984-85: end of Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccine school program for tuberculosis
  • 1984: the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine was incorporated by 73 founding Fellows and the 1st primary Exam conducted
  • 1983: new medical research centre was established at Fairfield and 1st AIDS patient admitted
  • 1983: measles–mumps vaccine introduced and hepatitis B vaccine (plasma-containing product) introduced
  • 1982: extension of the Essendon and District Memorial Hospital (EDMH) with the addition of more maternity beds and the construction of a general hospital completed
  • 1982: Pneumovax 14® vaccine introduced for pneumococcal disease
  • 1981: mumps vaccine introduced
  • 1981: Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine was established
  • 1980: smallpox vaccination ceased
  • 1977: 1st ultrasound machine purchased for RCH
  • 1975: South Wing Outpatients building added to RMH and Vascular Surgery Unit established
  • 1975: the Whitlam Federal Govt introduces Medibank - removing means-tested public hospital admissions and replacing it with a universal health “insurance”, providing free public hospital treatment for all patients
  • 1975: South East Purification Plant at Carrum opened to address the sewerage outflows of the rapidly expanding south-eastern suburban population growth
  • 1973: new North-West building at RCH opens
  • 1972: Intensive Care Unit (ICU) established at RMH
  • 1971: rubella vaccine introduced
  • 1969: the Melbourne Dental Hospital renamed Royal Melbourne Dental Hospital
  • 1969: measles vaccine introduced
  • 1967: Renal Unit established at RMH
  • 1967: first full time Director of a 'Casualty Department' in Australia was appointed in Geelong, Victoria
  • 1966: Melbourne District Nursing Society renamed Royal District Nursing Service (RDNS)
  • 1966: oral polio vaccine (OPV, Sabin) introduced
  • 1965: Clinical Sciences building added to RMH
  • 1965: Austin becomes affiliated with Uni Melb medical school
  • 1964: Gastroenterology and Respiratory Units established at RMH
  • 1964: the Maternity Wing of the Essendon and District Memorial Hospital (EDMH) is opened
  • 1964: new sewerage pumping station in Brooklyn superceded the old 19th century Spotswood one
  • 1963: the old RCH Redmond Barry building is demolished
  • 1963: the Melbourne Dental Hospital moved from Spring St to Parkville
  • 1962: the new RCH building opens
  • 1961: Monash University opens allowing for a 2nd medical school in Melbourne to be established which became affiliated with the Alfred and Prince Henry's Hospital
  • 1960s: Spinal Injuries Unit established at the Austin Hospital
  • 1962: Prince Henry's Hospital changes affiliation for medical schools to the Monash University's Faculty of Medicine
  • 1962: the amalgamation of the Victorian Branch of the British Medical Association and the MSV from 1907 finally form the Victorian Branch of the AMA.
  • 1960: Kew Asylum / Mental Hospital is renamed Willsmere Psychiatric Hospital
  • 1960: Royal is added to the name for the Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital
  • 1960: Prince Henry's Medical Research Centre established
  • 1958: new nurses home opens at RCH
  • 1958: first Victorian Mental Health Week was held by the Mental Hygiene Authority
  • 1957: Cardiology Department established at RMH
  • 1957: Channel 7 joins the Good Friday Appeal to introduce the all day telethon
  • 1956: Royal added to Women's Hospital to become the RWH
  • 1954: another severe polio outbreak then Salk vaccine becomes available in 1956
  • 1953: the Footscray and District Hospital opens (soon renamed Western General Hospital, then Maribyrnong Medical Centre, Western Hospital, and now called Footscray Hospital of the Western Health service)
  • 1953: Royal assent given to change name of the Childrens Hospital to the RCH
  • 1953: diphtheria–tetanus–pertussis (DTP) vaccine introduced (triple antigen)
  • 1952: Prince Henry's was affiliated to the University of Melbourne as an undergraduate and postgraduate teaching hospital
  • 1951: Fairhaven, for the treatment of venereal diseases, closes as the advent of penicillin meant prolonged hospitalisation was no longer needed. Reopened in 1956 as Fairlea Women's Prison.
  • 1950: the North Wing and a Resuscitation Ward (precursor to ICU) is added to the RMH
  • 1950: Peter MacCallum Clinic for cancer patients officially opens in one room of the QV Hospital
  • 1949: chemotherapy is used for the 1st time on leukaemia patients at The Childrens Hospital; severe polio outbreak;
  • 1948: Cancer Institute established by bill of State parliament, which was to pave the way for the Peter Mac Hosp
  • 1948: Department of Anaesthesia established at RMH
  • 1948: land acquired for the new childrens hospital
  • 1948: Queen's Memorial Hospital renamed Fairfield Hospital with new legislation also enabling the hospital to treat general medical and surgical patients.
  • 1948: Alfred Hospital takes over management of the Caulfield Convalescent Hospital
  • 1947: Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital (HRH) opens (succeeding the 115th Heidelberg Military Hospital )
  • 1946: Plastic and Facio-maxillary Unit established at RMH
  • 1945: the federal government passed the Commonwealth Hospital Benefits Act, offering both public and private hospitals a payment of six shillings per patient per day. The introduction of medical insurance allowed greater access to private care, the poor and most emergency care were left to the large public teaching hospitals
  • 1945: the Hospital and Charities Board asked the Essendon Council to consider establishing a hospital in honour of the men and women who served in the Second World War.
  • 1945: a joint Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery was established at RMH
  • 1945: tetanus toxoid vaccine available for civilians after World War II
  • 1944: the public finally get access to the new RMH and by the end of the year, patients were moved from the old site which was to become the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital until decommissioned in 1987
  • 1944: penicillin is used for the 1st time at The Childrens Hospital
  • 1942: the newly built RMH in Parkville is utilised by the military
  • 1940: Queen's Memorial became a Training School for nurses, Dr Frank Macfarlane Burnet, later Sir Macfarlane Burnet (Nobel Prize, 1960), was appointed consultant epidemiologist.
  • 1937-38: polio epidemic
  • 1936: Anti-Cancer Council of Victoria established by the state govt
  • 1936: Dr WK Bouton, the surgeon in charge at the Melbourne Homœopathic Hospital, died. He was probably the last “pure straight homœopath” to work at the Hospital.
  • 1935: Mercy Private Hospital established in East Melbourne by the Sisters of Mercy, a Catholic religious order involved in health care since providing extra nurses during the 1919 influenza epidemic
  • 1935: through Royal Charter, the Melbourne Hospital became known as The Royal Melbourne Hospital (RMH)
  • 1934: the Melbourne Homeopathic Hospital becomes Prince Henry’s allopathic hospital, in honour of the royal visit of the Duke of Gloucester was indicative of homoeopathy's fading appeal.
  • 1932: community immunisation for the public began
  • 1931: Herald and Weekly Times newspaper group starts the 1st Good Friday Appeal for the Childrens Hospital
  • 1930: A 100-bed orthopaedic campus of the Childrens Hospital is opened in Mt Eliza caring for children with tuberculosis, osteomyelitis and infantile paralysis.
  • 1929: ongoing overcrowding of the RMH results in plans to move it to Parkville Cow and Pig Market site
  • 1928: the Commonwealth X-ray and Radium Laboratory is established at Uni of Melb to store and distribute the nation's radium for cancer treatment
  • 1927: diphtheria toxoid vaccine introduced
  • 1926: The Alfred Hospital's Baker Medical Research Institute established, funded initially by Thomas Baker and his family
  • 1925: the Caulfield Hospital, a military and repatriation hospital, comes under the control of “The Melbourne Hospital” (RMH) as a convalescent hospital
  • 1925: Yarra Bend Asylum closes as patients transferred to the newly opened Mont Park Psychiatric Hospital. Buildings in the northern section of the parklands became part of the Fairfield Infectious Diseases Hospital. Other buildings previously used by male patients of the asylum were converted in 1927 to a hospital, known as Fairhaven, for the treatment of venereal diseases
  • 1925: tetanus toxoid vaccine introduced and pertussis toxoid vaccine used in case contacts and epidemics
  • 1924: diphtheria toxin–antitoxin introduced
  • 1922: Charities Board established to co-ordinate fund-raising activities for the public hospitals
  • 1920's: growing criticism of homeopathic practices and the Melbourne Homœopathic Hospital results in increasing use of orthodox doctors and the eventual replacement by orthodox medicine in the 1930s.
  • 1921: 1st auxiliary groups such as the Red Cross Auxiliary, established at RMH
  • 1921: 1st babies ward is opened at The Childrens Hospital
  • 1919: influenza pandemic
  • 1918: Vegetables and fruit, which doctors previously believed children couldn't digest, are included in patients diet for the first time at the Childrens Hospital
  • 1917: smallpox vaccine produced in Australia (since 1804 it was sourced from UK) and tetanus antitoxin introduced for the armed forces
  • 1915: the new “The Melbourne Hospital” (RMH) is already over-crowded with 375 patients accommodated by using the 320 beds plus balconies as makeshift wards
  • 1914: Act of Parliament established a board of management for the Queen's Memorial Hospital after years of public concern on its management
  • 1913: new “The Melbourne Hospital” (RMH) opens with 4 operating theatres, electric lifts, x-ray equipment, an ophthalmic and other specialised departments
  • 1912: Mont Park Asylum opens and housed ex-military personnel with psychiatric illnesses after 1915
  • 1908: decision finally made to rebuild “The Melbourne Hospital” (RMH) on its existing site after failure to acquire a Parkville
  • 1908: the Victorian branch of the British Medical Association drew up a code of ethics which excluded from membership those who “based their practice on an exclusive dogma, such as homœopathy”, and forbade its members to consult with those who did so.
  • 1907: Victorian Branch of the British Medical Association and the MSV amalgamated
  • 1907: Royal Park Asylum opens
  • 1906: the Victorian Medical Act was amended to regulate the admission of medical practitioners who had qualified in other countries, and in particular those that had not complete a course of training equivalent to that of the Melbourne University where five years of study was required, but as a result of pressure, a special exemption was obtained for the Melbourne Homœopathic Hospital, permitting the importation of one doctor a year from either the Boston Homœopathic University and medical College, or the New York Homœopathic Medical College and Hospital.
  • 1906: Bethesda Hospital was opened by the Salvation Army - the first not-for-profit hospital established to cater for wage and salary earners who could not afford expensive private hospital care
  • 1904: new operating theatre and a new casualty-room were opened at the Melbourne Homœopathic Hospital
  • 1904: in response to the need for public hospital access during epidemics, the Queen's Memorial Hospital in Fairfield opens (later renamed Fairfield Infectious Diseases Hospital)
  • 1903: Kew asylum renamed the Hospital for the Insane

19th century

  • 1898: 1st skiagraphist, later called radiologist, appointed at “RMH”
  • 1898: 1st female doctor appointed at the Childrens Hospital
  • 1897: The Childrens Hospital is the 1st public hospital in Melbourne to open a radiology department
  • 1897: 1st Melbourne house connected to the new sewage system with pumping station located in Spotwood which pumped it into a large channel to a treating station in Werribee where it was used to irrigate a sheep and cattle farm
  • 1896: 1st female doctors appointed at “RMH”
  • 1896: diphtheria antitoxin 1st used at the Childrens Hospital
  • 1894: the Williamstown, Footscray and District General Hospital was established on the current site of the Williamstown Hospital
  • 1894: 1st anaesthetist appointed at “RMH”
  • 1893: St Vincents Hospital established by the Sisters of Charity, an Irish Catholic religious order invited from Sydney by Archbishop Thomas Carr. Led by the 'amiable despot' Mother Berchmans Daly, as founding mother rectress
  • 1892: the “RMH” building was officially condemned but continued in use whilst plans were considered to move closer to the University in Parkville
  • 1891: 1st telephone line installed at the Childrens Hospital
  • 1891: Melbourne and Metropolitan Board of Works was created to sewer Melbourne and take over the running of its water supply
  • 1890: the Melbourne Dental Hospital began as a single room in Lonsdale Street opposite the “RMH”
  • 1889: 1st Nightingale trained nurse appointed at “RMH”
  • 1889: Private Hospitals Act, 1889 was the 1st attempt by the govt to regulate the charity public hospitals, as well as a plethora of small private hospitals that had opened in Melbourne, some of dubious standards, but givt did not wish to end up being responsible for providing these services, hence, while public health and psychiatric services were provided by government, until 1948 hospitals reported only to Treasury.
  • 1888: the Alfred Hospital commences medical student training, enabling Melbourne's first female medical undergraduates to obtain essential clinical experience denied them elsewhere, but distance from the Uni of melbourne was problematic resulting in periods of the school's closure 1894-1910
  • 1887: The Childrens Hospital becomes officially recognised as a nurse training school
  • 1887: first three of a series of cottages added to Kew Asylum and named Cottages for Idiots, and later Kew Cottages
  • 1885: 1st special department of the “RMH” introduced - the Department of Skin Diseases was established for outpatients
  • 1885: Melbourne District Nursing Society founded (later Royal District Nursing Service - RDNS)
  • 1885: Melbourne Homœopathic Hospital in St Kilda Rd completed and opens mainly for the poor (in 1934 it became Prince Henry’s allopathic hospital)
  • 1884: Melbourne Lying-In Hospital and Infirmary for the Diseases Peculiar to Women and Children is renamed the Women's Hospital
  • 1882: The Austin Hospital opened in Heidelberg as the Hospital for Incurables with a £6000 donation from Elizabeth Austin to help incurable cancer, tuberculosis or paralysis patients, who were often excluded from other public hospitals.
  • 1879: 1st medical students accepted at The Childrens Hospital
  • 1879: Sunbury Asylum opens and became to specialise in the intellectually handicapped
  • 1879: Victorian Branch of the British Medical Association formed after factional disagreements within the MSV
  • 1878: Infectious Diseases Pavilion opens at the Childrens Hospital and organised training of nurses begins and a uniform is introduced
  • 1876: The Children's Hospital moves to the former home of famous Melbourne judge Redmond Barry on the corner of Pelham and Rathdowne Sts, Carlton with 24 beds and the old building is soon used as a temporary site for the homœopathic hospital - the 2nd in the Southern Hemisphere (1st in NZ), while the site on St Kilda Rd was being built for the permanent Melbourne Homœopathic Hospital in 1885 (which would later become the Prince Henry Hospital)
  • 1874: the 1st “Hospital Sunday” appeal for the Childrens Hospital - most funds coming from State Schools
  • 1871: Key Asylum for mentally ill opens but is soon over-crowded
  • 1870: Victorian Association of Progressive Spiritualists founded - the first association of its kind in Australia - Spiritualism was grounded in mesmerism; the hypnotisation of 'sensitives' became the basis for the entrancement of 'mediums'. Terry also believed that 'the projection of spiritual force, directed by the benevolent will of the operator' was 'adequate by steady application to overcome the most obstinate cases of dipsomania' (alcoholism).
  • 1870: The Alfred Hospital is built
  • 1870: the “Melbourne Free Hospital for Sick Children” - name changed to “Melbourne Hospital for Sick Children” in 1872 when it moves to 13 Spring St in a hospital double the size (RCH) opens
  • 1867: Victoria's first Lunacy Statute enacted - two asylums in rural locations at Ararat and Beechworth were opened, followed by Kew Asylum in 1871
  • 1865: “RWH” became the first specialist teaching hospital as Tracy was appointed lecturer in obstetrics at the new Medical School in the University of Melbourne.
  • 1864: “RMH” commences training medical students
  • 1863: Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital established by Irish-born surgeon Andrew Sexton Gray
  • 1862: RWH becomes first Australian hospital to train nurses
  • 1861: Medical Registration Act, which established firm regulations regarding the practice of medicine in Victoria and stamped out much 'quackery', owed its germination and success to the political efforts of the MSV
  • 1856: an asylum in Kew for mental health patients is proposed to replace the Yarra Bend Asylum
  • 1856: Melbourne Lying-In Hospital and Infirmary for the Diseases Peculiar to Women and Children established (later Royal Womens Hospital - RWH) initially, in a terrace house in Albert Street, East Melbourne, but in 1858 re-located to Grattan Street, Carlton, founded by a group of evangelical ladies led by Mrs Frances Perry, wife of the Anglican Bishop of Melbourne
  • 1855: University of Melbourne established
  • 1853: the Immigrants Home established but, as with the Benevolent Asylum, restricted their hospital wards to chronic and aged care
  • 1850: Benevolent Asylum established
  • 1848: Yarra Bend Asylum opens as the first purpose-built asylum in the Melbourne metropolitan area and took in inmates from Melbourne Gaol where such people were previously housed (or sent to Tarban Creek Asylum near Sydney)
  • 1848: RMH established on the corner of Lonsdale and Swanston Streets as The Melbourne Hospital - the 1st public hospital in Victoria - medical staff were voted in for 4yrs by the public at The Athenaem (this method continued until 1910)
  • 1846: Port Phillip Medical Association, founded by 12 doctors (folded in 1852 and was replaced six months later by the Medical Society of Victoria (MSV))
  • 1842: temporary establishment of the RMH - the primary function of the new hospital was to accommodate those who were too poor to pay for care at home - in this era before anaesthetics, antiseptics and aseptic techniques in nursing and surgery, those that could afford to do so chose to be treated at home.
  • 1841: “a group of influential citizens, headed by Charles LaTrobe, Superintendent of the Port Phillip District, called for a public meeting to discuss the urgent need for a public hospital in Melbourne”
  • 1838: administrators of the Port Phillip District open a small hospital in William Street but admission was restricted to convicts and new immigrants
  • 1830's: phrenology is popular but its popularity ended by the 1870s, but despite phrenology's diminished status in the later 19th century, it nevertheless influenced early 20th-century criminological theories
  • The decision of the British colonial government to accept responsibility for the health care of convicts and military personnel but not for that of free settlers established the model for hospital provision in Melbourne until the 1970s
  • In the mid 19th century hospitals really only provided basic nursing care and thus hospitals were made up of:
    • British funded facilities for convicts and military
    • Charity funded “public” hospitals for the poor
    • small private hospitals paid for by the upper class
    • Most other “patients” tended to stay at home and be cared for by family and local doctors
h_medicine_vic.txt · Last modified: 2019/05/13 01:06 by wh